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Pregnancy after Miscarriage

Miscarriage may be one of the most painful experiences that one can encounter. After a miscarriage, trying out to conceive again may be a difficult decision. It is natural to desire to be pregnant again right after a miscarriage to overcome the loss. However, it must be put into mind that attempt should be done only once after you are physically and emotionally ready.

Right time to wait after a miscarriage?

There is no right time to wait before trying to be pregnant again. However, many healthcare providers advice that a woman should wait at least a few months to increase her chances for a healthy pregnancy. This is because it takes time for the uterus and endometrial lining to recover.

Safe time for conception?

Medically, conception after two or three menstrual periods is considered safe if the woman is not undergoing tests or treatments for the reason of the miscarriage. Some physicians suggest that couples should wait six months to a year in order to come to terms with the loss. On the other hand, some physicians disagree and argue that there is no compelling reason for the long wait.

Afraid that miscarriage will happen again?

Many couples who have experienced miscarriage are afraid that it might happen to them again. Studies show that at least 85% of the women who have had one loss were able to have a successful pregnancy after, while 75% for those who have experienced more than one loss already.

Improving the chances of a healthy pregnancy.

There are many ways to increase the chances of a healthy pregnancy. However, you might want to seek help if you are over the age of 35 or had two or more miscarriages, have fertility problems, or has an illness that might affect pregnancy.

Pregnancy after a miscarriage is often taken with more caution. In case a woman becomes pregnant again, this time her pregnancy should be more carefully monitored. Earlier preparations such as baby showers ought to be avoided until after the arrival of the baby.

The mother should also listen to medical advices rather than hearsays. Support groups and counseling might also help overcome the loss of the previous baby and help prepare the mother-to-be with the arrival of the new one.

Miscarriage is really painful. But for most, a loss does not mean it is the end of the world. It might be a challenge, yet it serves as a preparation couples with the coming of their new child.